Michigan Conference American Association of University Professors

Michigan Conference American Association of University Professors

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Indiana reaction belies pro-Right to Work claims

Created on Tuesday, 08 January 2013 15:11

Indiana reaction belies pro-Right to Work claims


By Ted Roelofs/Bridge Magazine contributor


FORT WAYNE, Ind. — In the weeks after “Right to Work” became law in Indiana, Michigan-based Android Industries was anointed a poster child for the job growth state officials predicted would flow from the measure.
Company officials insisted it was no accident they picked Indiana to open an automotive plant in suburban Fort Wayne in 2012. It supplies mounted tires for full-sized pickup trucks assembled at an adjacent General Motors plant.
“Recently, Indiana became a right-to-work state and offers us a competitive location and a skilled work force to complement our state of the art technology,” the firm said in a statement in March 2012. “All of these factors went into choosing Indiana as an optimal location.”
But a closer look belies that claim, since Android Industries, in fact, laid plans for the Indiana expansion well before it became law in February 2012.
An official at the plant confirmed as much to a reporter last month.
“Right to Work has nothing do with us being here,” said Jeremy Urshel, listed as human resources generalist for the firm. Another official said the firm signed the contract with GM in November 2011.

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Arizona universities turn to cities inlieu of state support

Created on Thursday, 01 December 2011 14:12

Arizona universities turn to cities in lieu of state support [1]
Submitted by Kevin Kiley [2] on December 1, 2011 - 3:00am

The two newest public university campuses in Arizona -- Northern Arizona University’s campus in Prescott Valley [3], which is in its second year of operation, and Arizona State University’s Lake Havasu campus [4], slated to open in fall 2012 -- will be testing grounds for some fairly innovative concepts.


Tuition at both is significantly lower than at the universities’ main campuses. Administrators have pledged to try alternative delivery methods designed to cut down on costs. Both institutions have partnered with local community colleges to teach some classes. And both hope to offer accelerated degree programs.


But the most innovative feature might be one that students never see: how the universities are funded. Unlike other public campuses, neither is receiving direct funding from the state, and both received significant indirect investment from municipal governments and local residents. Whereas the main campuses fund about a quarter of their operations through state appropriations, a percentage that has decreased significantly since 2008, the branch campuses will try to be self-sufficient, operating mostly on tuition revenue, with only some administrative expenses being shared with the main campuses.

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